on saleDavid Oscarson Sea Turtle Fountain Pen - White/Blue

Product Code DO-TWB-F

In Stock

out of stock

Usually Ships in 1 to 2 Business Days

on saleDavid Oscarson Sea Turtle Fountain Pen - White/Blue

Product Code DO-TWB-F

In Stock

out of stock

Usually Ships in 1 to 2 Business Days

$6,400.00

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Ancient, intelligent, beautiful and shy, Sea Turtles play a vital role in maintaining the health of the world’s oceans. These graceful giants have peacefully roamed the earth for millennia; surviving numerous obstacles including the extinction of dinosaurs.

Six of the seven species that swim the planet’s waters - leatherback, loggerhead, Kemp’s ridley, green, olive ridley, and hawksbill - are found in every ocean except the Arctic and Antarctic. The seventh, the flatback, lives only in the waters around Australia.

Sea turtles make incredibly long migrations between feeding and breeding areas (the leatherback travels an average of 3,700 miles each way). Mating occurs at sea, followed by pilgrimages to beaches several times per season every 2 to 5 years to lay their eggs. Females dig a hole in the sand, deposit their clutch of eggs (up to 100 in the leatherback’s case), cover them up and return to the sea.

Sand temperature determines the sex of the eggs. After about 60 days, the eggs hatch and tiny hatchlings make their way from the nest to the water at night, often a deadly ordeal as seabirds, crabs, and other predators prey on the young turtles. Natural light at the horizon guides the hatchings to the ocean. Lights from hotels, homes, and other buildings can confuse the turtles into heading the wrong way. Only one out of 1,000 hatchlings survives to reach adulthood. Their lifespan however, is long; some sea turtles can live to be 100 years old.

Omnivorous turtles may eat a wide variety of plant and animal life, however, some species specialize on certain prey; the Leatherback feeds almost exclusively on jellyfish which helps control jellyfish populations. Sea Turtles can slow their heart rate to one beat every nine minutes, conserving oxygen and allowing them to hold their breath for up to five hours underwater.

The Sea Turtle Collection is the 33rd in the David Oscarson series of Limited Edition Writing Instruments; it is a salt water companion to the Koi Collection released in 2017.

The Sea Turtle Collection features three majestic Sea Turtles coasting through a coral reef. Ocean currents and schools of fish surround a beautiful seascape of coral and angelfish in high and low relief. The tortoise-shell gipping section is complimented by a coral clip and the Japanese symbols for Sea and Turtle are artistically displayed on the bottom and top of each Collection piece. The Japanese character meaning Turtle appears in high relief on the top of the Cap, while, the character meaning Sea sits at the bottom. In keeping with the Koi Collection, David Oscarson is engraved in Japanese script on the ring of the cap.

The Sea Turtle Collection continues in the spirit of artistic mastery and the tradition of Old World craftsmanship by combining the centuries-old technique of Guilloché with the art and expertise of Hard Enamel.

Using a mortar and pestle, a composition of glass, water and metal oxides is ground for hours by hand. When settled, the water is removed, leaving the fine paste that is the basis for hard enamel. A quill is then used to apply each coat of the mixture to the surface of the metal, ensuring that the entire guilloché area is completely covered in enamel. The components are then fired in a furnace at temperatures exceeding 1,000° F, fusing the enamel to the metal and forming a layer of glass.

After cooling, the pieces are manually ground with a diamond file, restoring their proper shape and surface. This tedious process is repeated at length until the level of enamel reaches the depth required to cover the peaks and fill the valleys of each intricate guilloché pattern. When the final stages of firing are completed, the pieces are polished and buffed, revealing the velvet finish of translucent hard enamel.

Production of translucent hard enamel demands the highest levels of patience, experience and skill. A five-year apprenticeship is required to ensure that the highest levels of quality will be met in each individual Collection piece.

Please allow us up to several extra days for shipping of this pen. Please also note we are unable to accept a return of this pen for any reason once it has been used with ink. Please thoroughly inspect and dry test the pen before use.

Technical Specs

Condition
New
Brand
David Oscarson
Type
Fountain Pens
Color
Blue
Demonstrator

Whether or not the barrel of the pen is translucent, allowing you to see the ink and filling mechanism inside.

No
Body Material
Hard Enamel over Metal
Cap Type

How the cap is opened/closed from the barrel of the pen. Some common options include Snap-Cap, Screw-Cap, Magnetic Cap, or Capless (no cap).

Screw-cap
Filling Mechanism

How the pen fills with ink. Click here to watch our video tutorial on common filling mechanisms.

Cartridge, Converter, Eyedropper
Grip Material
Metal
Nib Size
Fine, Medium, Broad
Nib Color
Two-Tone
Nib Material
18k Gold
Postable

Whether or not the cap fits securely onto the back of the barrel when open.

No
Retractable

Whether or not the nib/tip can retract into the body of the pen (usually for click or twist-open style pens).

No
Trim
Gold Vermeil

Videos

Reviews & Questions

FAQS

How do I fill a fountain pen with ink?

It depends on the pen's filling mechanism, which you can find in the Technical Specs section above.

Here's a quick definition of the most common filling mechanisms:

Cartridge - A small, disposable, sealed plastic reservoir that holds fountain pen ink. These come pre-filled with ink, and typically you just push to insert them into place and you'll be ready to write!

Converter - A detachable and refillable ink reservoir that allows you to use bottled ink in a cartridge-accepting pen. Typically you will install the converter into the grip section, dip the nib/feed into the ink, and twist or pull the converter knob to draw ink into the converter. Here's a video for how to fill a cartridge/converter pen using a LAMY pen as an example.

Eyedropper - A pen that utilizes the entire barrel as a reservoir for ink. Ink is directly filled into the barrel, allowing for a high ink capacity. Here's a video on how to do it!

Piston - A type of filling system that uses a retracting plunger inside a sealed tube to draw ink into a pen. They are typically either twist or push-operated. These pens cannot accept cartridges or a converter, and only fill from bottled ink.

Vacuum - A push-style piston that uses pressure to fill the large pen body with ink. They seal the ink chamber when closed, making it ideal for flying without risk of leaking.

You can learn more with our Fountain Pen 101 video on Filling Mechanisms on YouTube.

How do I clean a fountain pen?

It depends on the filling mechanism, but it mostly comes down to flushing it out with water, and sometimes a little bit of Pen Flush if the ink is really stuck.

It's a bit easier to show than to tell, so we've put together a few quick videos showing you the process:

How to Clean a Cartridge/Converter Pen

How to Clean an Eyedropper Pen

How to Clean a Piston Pen

How often do I need to clean my fountain pen?

We recommend a good cleaning every 2 weeks, and any time you change ink colors.

Water will usually do the trick, but we recommend you use our Goulet Pen Flush if the ink has been left in the pen for a while and could have dried up, or when you’re switching ink colors.

My pen won’t write! What do I do?

First things first... make sure you have ink in the pen! Be sure that the ink cartridge or converter is seated properly in the pen, and that you aren't out of ink.

We always recommend you give your pen a good cleaning first, using our Goulet Pen Flush, or a drop of dish soap in some water. New pens often have some machining oil residue left in the feed, so a good cleaning often does the trick first.

If that still doesn't work, try priming the feed. This consists of either dipping your pen nib and feed in ink, or forcing ink from the converter down into the feed.

If it’s still not working after that, please reach out to us so we can help!

What’s your return policy?

You can submit a return request within 60 days of your order date. You can read all our Return Policies here.

To initiate a return, please submit a request at the Return Portal. Our Customer Care team might reach out to you for more information.

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David Oscarson Sea Turtle Fountain Pen - White/Blue
David Oscarson Sea Turtle Fountain Pen - White/Blue
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